Reading Tips

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Reading Tips
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      Children should read daily at home. When helping your child with reading at home, you can use these strategies in solving unknown words.
  • Take a Picture Walk through a new story. Have your child look at each picture and describe out loud what they see in the pictures. Have them make predictions about the story after looking at the front cover and pictures in the book.
  • Modelling: Model the story for your child. Read an unfamiliar story to them once, first, before they begin. This way, they can hear the way the story should sound and begin at a comfortable level. Have them track the words with you by using their finger to point to words as you read.
  • Unfamiliar Words: Have you child "frame" or put pointer fingers around words that they think might be hard for them to read. Help them sound out these words by "STRETCHING" the word like bubble gum and sounding out each letter/phonogram. Then have them blend the word back together by "letting the bubble gum go"...it will visually help them put the word's sounds together.
  • Finding chunks, phonograms, words inside words: Students are learning letter combinations called chunks and phonograms that they  can find inside words. This helps them to sound out a word more effectively. They enjoy finding familiar words inside of words and phonograms too! Also, if there are words that have "Magic/silent e" remind them that e is silent and might make a vowel say its name.
  • TIME TO READ!!! Now it is time for them to read. Remind your child to get their mouth ready for the first sound of each word before they begin. This will help them to look at the beginning sound of the word first and sound it out from there. Your child needs to be word tracking or pointing to the words as they read them. Remind your child to "keep their lightbulb turned on" while reading. This is a fun visual way to remind them to think as they are reading.
  • Stop frequently! After a page or paragraph, stop your child and ask them to tell you what just happened in the story. This trains them learn to comprehend as they move through the story instead of forgetting as they read.
  • Read many times: reading the story (even if it is familiar) more than once will help your child build fluency. They will be able to read more confidentally and more quickly. Another fun way to build fluency is to have them "beat the clock" each time they read. Time how long it takes to read the story and then each time they will try to beat their time from before.
  • Do they comprehend? When your child finishes reading a story, ask them questions about the characters, setting, events, problem, solution. Have them draw or explain what happened at the beginning, middle and end of the story. Ask who, what, when, where, and why main idea questions about the story.

Happy Reading!!!!

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